OUR CHEFS

Antojeria

Edgar
Núñez

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Javier
Plascencia

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Roberto
Solís

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Jair
Téllez

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Jorge
Vallejo

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Edgar Núñez (Mexico City)

Sud 777, Mexico City

He took diploma courses on Viticulture and Liquors and obtained the title of Culinary Trainee from the Maîtres Cuisiners de France. He trained in elBulli, in Spain, in Noma, in Denmark and in the establishments of Paul Bocuse, in France. He also worked with Olivier Lombard, in L’Olivier. He is a member of the Académie Culinaire de France, and one of the hosts of the television program Hombres en la cocina. Today he is the executive chef and joint owner of the restaurant Sud777, considered by the specialized publications as one of the best in Mexico City. The sophistication with which he uses the national ingredients and the syncretism of his elegant dishes, full of color and flavor, earned him the Distinción Bohemia award in 2012.

Javier Plascencia (Tijuana)

Misión 19, Tijuana

He was born and raised in Tijuana in a family setting marked by the restaurant milieu. Plascencia has used the bicultural experience of life on the border to promote, develop and present the gastronomic potential of Baja California in Mexico and in the United States. In 2011 he opened Misión 19, which stands out for using in its dishes the ingredients available in the area that the chef considers his territory, from Los Ángeles to San Quintín. This cuisine, described with the adjectives sustainable, organic, traditional and Baja Mediterranean, led him to become a member of the ChefDance, the gastronomic part of the Sundance Film Festival. In 2012 he founded the Baja Culinary Fest for which he was awarded the Premio a la Diversificación del Producto Turístico Mexicano.

Roberto Solís (Yucatán)

Néctar, Mérida

In 2003, he founded Nectar Food & Wine, the first haute cuisine restaurant in the city of Merida. Two years later, with the intention of enriching his culinary proposal, he traveled to England where he worked at the Fat Duck and learned molecular gastronomy techniques. In the summer of 2006 he went to Denmark and was in the famous restaurant Noma. There he gained experience in the New Scandinavian Kitchen Cuisine alongside the chef René Redzepi. He has been invited to take part in very important festivals and congresses, such as the Festival Sabor in San Miguel de Allende, the III Edition of Madrid Fusión México and the Cancun-Riviera Maya Wine and Food Festival.

Jair Téllez (Hermosillo)

Laja, Baja California, and Merotoro, Mexico City

He studied at The French Culinary Institute in New York, and has worked at Daniel in New York, La Folie and Gordon’s House of Fine Eats in San Francisco, and at the Four Seasons Hotel in Mexico. In the Valle de Guadalupe he found the ideal spot to embark on his dream to open his own restaurant, Laja, extolling Baja Californian cuisine. He lives in Mexico City, where he promotes the Baja Californian cuisine in the Merotoro restaurant.

Jorge Vallejo (Mexico City)

Quintonil, Mexico City

After studying at the Centro Culinario Ambrosía, he began a long sea voyage as a chef on the Princess cruise ships. On his return to Mexico, he joined the team at the Pujol restaurant and later became the corporate chef of the Grupo Habita. In 2010 he was invited to become the Executive Chef of the Hotel St. Regis, Mexico City His work has been praised in national and foreign magazines such as Gula, Chilango, El Universal, Luxury + Travel, among others. In 2012 Vallejo began a new venture, together with his wife Alejandra Flores, opening the restaurant Quintonil, in Mexico City. A year after its opening, Quintonil has become one of the most solid and promising gastronomic offers in the country.

The word mezcal is derived from the Nahuatl language: Mexcallí.

Metl = Maguey
Ixcalli = Cocido

Mezcal is obtained by means of a long and complex artisan process of baking, fermentation and distillation of the heart of the maguey cactus.

Each type of mezcal is unique, its flavor determined by the species of maguey, the tradition of the region in which it is produced and the recipe of the master mezcalero in charge.

Agave Karwinskii

Agave Americana

Agave Cupreata

Agave Angustifolia

Agave Potatorum

Agave Salmiana

Agave Marmorata

Agave Duranguensis

1- Care of the ecosystem

To ensure the continuity of the mezcal tradition, it is indispensable to take care of the ecological equilibrium, promote the reproduction of wild agaves, reforest and care for the fauna that pollinate the agaves.

2 - Maguey selection and trimming

Solely ripe agaves are selected - each species has a distinct maturation time ranging from 8 to 40 years. Trimming consists of cutting the long stalks in order to extract the heart of the plant.

3 - Baking the maguey

The agave hearts (also called piñas) are baked for 3 to 8 days underground in volcanic stone ovens in order to extract the sugars.

4 - Grinding of the maguey

The baked maguey is ground to extract the juice and begin the fermentation process of the sugars.

Fermentation

This is the longest stage of the process - the juice is allowed to ferment for 8 to 15 days depending on the climate and tradition of the region.

6 - Distillation

This is carried out in a still- the heat provokes evaporation of the alcohol which, upon condensation, will make up the mezcal. Distillation has three stages, the master mezcalero determines the quantity of mezcal to be used from each stage for the final blend.

1-Observe

Stir the mezcal to observe its transparency, the pearling and its body and consistency.

2-Touch

Rub a drop of mezcal between your thumb and index finger to feel the texture, which may be coarse, oily or dry. Next, place a drop in the palm of your hand and rub it so as to heat and evaporate the alcohol, then hold your hand up to your nose.

3-Smell

Discover the aroma of smoked maguey in your hands, smell the glass in different positions and open your mouth to take in the aroma, feeling the aroma as it intensifies, and try to find memories connected to these aromas in your olfactory memory.

4-Savor

The first kiss

Take a small sip of the mezcal and spread it over your palate, tongue and mouth. Continue smelling the mezcal until your tongue begins to salivate and prepare for a second drink.

The deep kiss

Take a bigger sip of the mezcal and then tip your head back, softly allowing the mezcal to pour little by little down your throat, drinking it very slowly.

The romance

Take a drink of the mezcal and once you have swallowed it take a deep breath, slowly inhaling through your mouth and exhaling through your nose. Feel how your sense of smell and taste connect to explore the full array of aromas and flavors.

5- Order another shot!